Lojong Start Page

Random Lojong Slogan Generator

This page is a random Lojong Slogan generator. If you click the “Random Lojong Slogan” button at the right, a random Lojong slogan will appear here, along with an image. If you want a different slogan, just press the button again.

The image has not been correlated to the slogan. It also partakes in the randomness of the environment. All of the images are in the Public Domain. They have been provided by the Cleveland Museum of Art Open Access initiative. But the images are not meant to illustrate the slogans. They’re just beautiful images from the history of Buddhism.

What is Lojong?

If you’re already a master of Lojong, you should skip this section. Otherwise, the information might be useful.

“Lojong” is a Tibetan word usually translated as “mind training”. There are two approaches that are best known: 1) The Seven Point Mind Training of Chekawa Yeshe Dorje (1102-1176) and 2) Eight Verses of Training the Mind by Geshe Langri Tangpa (1054 – 1153). Though these two are the best known, there are many texts of the Lojong, or Mind Training, category. See the select bibliogtraphy below.

The 59 random “slogans” or “instructions” or “sayings” on these pages come from The Seven Point Mind Training of Chekawa Yeshe Dorje. The 59 slogans are distributed among 7 points: 

  1. Train in the Preliminaries
  2. The Actual Practice
  3. Transforming Adversity into the Path of Awakening
  4. Practicing Mind Training Throughout Our Lives
  5. Evaluating Mind Training
  6. The Disciplines of Mind Training
  7. Guidelines for Mind Training

The purpose here is to provide the instructions randomly because sometimes it’s useful to break things out of their linear containers. Ken McLeod provides a more structured encounter with the instructions. He has translated the root (or source) text, and each instruction of the root text is linked to an explanation, or commentary.  You can find the root text translated at Unfettered Mind. Although the link takes you directly to the root text, I suggest that you read the introductory material in order to get oriented.

Be aware that the translations at Unfettered Mind differ from the translations here. It might seem difficult at first, but it’s actually a blessing. No single translation can give the full meaning of the original, so it’s good to have more than one. The slogans/instructions are numbered, so you can easily correlate them.

Besides Mr. McLeod’s presentation, there are a number of excellent books on the subject. My personal favorite is Traleg Kyabgon’s The Practice of Lojong: Cultivating Compassion through Training the Mind. But you should read them all and decide for yourself. I’ve listed a selection below.

If you are attracted to these teachings, please seek out a qualified lama to guide you through them. A lama can save you a lot of time and heartache. Why go it alone when there’s so much help available?

Books about the Seven Point Mind Training:

Websites with Translated Commentaries on the Seven Point Mind Training:

Lojong Start Page

Random Lojong Slogan Generator

This page is a random Lojong Slogan generator. If you click the “Random Lojong Slogan” button above, a random Lojong slogan will apper here, along with an image. If you want a different slogan, just press the button again.

The image has not been correlated to the slogan. It also partakes in the randomness of the environment. All of the images are in the Public Domain. They have been provided by the Cleveland Museum of Art Open Access initiative. But the images are not meant to illustrate the slogans. They’re just beautiful images from the history of Buddhism.

What is Lojong?

If you’re already a master of Lojong, you should skip this section. Otherwise, the information might be useful.

“Lojong” is a Tibetan word usually translated as “mind training”. There are two approaches that are best known: 1) The Seven Point Mind Training of Chekawa Yeshe Dorje (1102-1176) and 2) Eight Verses of Training the Mind by Geshe Langri Tangpa (1054 – 1153). Though these two are the best known, there are many texts of the Lojong, or Mind Training, category. See the select bibliogtraphy below.

The 59 random “slogans” or “instructions” or “sayings” on these pages come from The Seven Point Mind Training of Chekawa Yeshe Dorje. The 59 slogans are distributed among 7 points:

  1. Train in the Preliminaries
  2. The Actual Practice
  3. Transforming Adversity into the Path of Awakening
  4. Practicing Mind Training Throughout Our Lives
  5. Evaluating Mind Training
  6. The Disciplines of Mind Training
  7. Guidelines for Mind Training

The purpose here is to provide the instructions randomly because sometimes it’s useful to break things out of their linear containers. Ken McLeod provides a more structured encounter with the instructions. He has translated the root (or source) text, and each instruction of the root text is linked to an explanation, or commentary.  You can find the root text translated at Unfettered Mind. Although the link takes you directly to the root text, I suggest that you read the introductory material in order to get oriented.

Be aware that the translations at Unfettered Mind differ from the translations here. It might seem difficult at first, but it’s actually a blessing. No single translation can give the full meaning of the original, so it’s good to have more than one. The slogans/instructions are numbered, so you can easily correlate them.

Besides Mr. McLeod’s presentation, there are a number of excellent books on the subject. My personal favorite is Traleg Kyabgon’s The Practice of Lojong: Cultivating Compassion through Training the Mind. But you should read them all and decide for yourself. I’ve listed a selection below.

If you are attracted to these teachings, please seek out a qualified lama to guide you through them. A lama can save you a lot of time and heartache. Why go it alone when there’s so much help available?

Books about the Seven Point Mind Training:

Websites with Translated Commentaries on the Seven Point Mind Training: