Lojong Slogan Generator

36. Don’t put exchange value on things

  • This is the Fourteenth Slogan/Instruction of Point Six, which consists of sixteen instructions.
  • Point Six is “The Disciplines of Mind Training”

Chögyam Trungpa and Khenchen Trangu Rinpoche both translate this one as “Don’t act with a twist.” 

The literal meaning in Tibetan of this instruction is that we don’t undertake hardships motivated by a calculated intent. Of course, it is nice to go to trouble for others, to be willing to suffer so that others are happy, but if our motivation is to help ourselves so that in the end we win material things or receive acclaim from others then we are acting with a hidden motivation.

We might say, “Okay, I agree you won in this case,” with the hidden intent that it is ultimately we who will prevail. Or we might give something to somebody, not out of generosity, but because we hope to get something from them later on. This is the wrong motivation.

The Seven Points of Mind Training by Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche

Silver inlaid with turquoise, copper, brass and gold; gilt bronze lotus; overall: 32.4 cm (12 3/4 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Bodhisattva Maitreya: The Future Buddha, 1100s. East India, Bengal, Pala period. Silver inlaid with turquoise, copper, brass and gold; gilt bronze lotus; overall: 32.4 cm (12 3/4 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Lojong Slogan Generator

29. Give up poisonous food

  • This is the Seventh Slogan/Instruction of Point Six, which consists of sixteen instructions.
  • Point Six is “The Disciplines of Mind Training”]

Chögyam Trungpa wrote,

This is a very powerful slogan for us. It means that whatever we do with our practice, if that practice is connected with our personal achievement, which is called “spiritual materialism,” or the individual glory that we are in the right and others are wrong, and we would like to conquer their wrongness or evil because we are on the side of God and so forth—that kind of bullshit or cow dung is regarded as eating poisonous food. Such food may be presented to us beautifully and nicely, but when we begin to eat it, it stinks.

Chögyam Trungpa, Training the Mind and Cultivating Loving-Kindness

And Dza Patrul, quoted by Traleg Kyabgon to illustrate this slogan, 

One day Geshe Ben was expecting a visit from a large number of his benefactors. That morning he arranged the offerings on his shrine in front of the images of the Three Jewels particularly neatly. Examining his intentions, he realized that they were not pure  and that he was only trying to impress his patrons; so he picked up a handful of dust and threw it all over the offerings, saying, “Monk, just stay where you are and don’t put on airs!”

When Phadampa Sangye heard this story, he exclaimed: “That handful of dust that Ben Kungyal threw was the best offering in all Tibet!”

Patrul Rinpoche, Words of My Perfect Teacher

 

Color on cloth; overall: 109.5 x 82.5 cm (43 1/8 x 32 1/2 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Thangka with Bejeweled Buddha Preaching, 1648. Nepal. Color on cloth; overall: 109.5 x 82.5 cm (43 1/8 x 32 1/2 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art