Lojong Slogan Generator

40. All corrections are made in one way

  • This is the Second Slogan/Instruction of Point Seven, which consists of twenty-one instructions.
  • Point Seven is “Guidelines for Mind Training”\

Some who are under Māra’s influence fail to develop confidence in this spiritual practice. They experience the false perceptions of misguided meditation practice, with thoughts like: “Since I began practicing mind training, illnesses have increased, harms from demons have increased, people have become more hostile, and afflictions such as self-grasping have increased as well.” Based on such thoughts, or for no particular reason, they lose enthusiasm for mind training and are in danger of turning away. When this happens, you should become aware of it right there and then and think, “A misguided meditative practice has arisen in me.” With a second thought you should reflect, “There must be many beings like me in the universe whose thoughts have deviated from [true] Dharma practice,” and take all of these [deviations] upon yourself and offer your body, wealth, and virtues to others. Imagine that because of this, the thoughts of those others turn toward the Dharma, and these others enter the unmistaken path.

“A Commentary on the “Seven-Point Mind Training” by Sé Chilbu Chökyi Gyaltsen (1121– 89), in Mind Training: The Great Collection translated by Thupten Jinpa

Opaque watercolor and ink on cotton; overall: 94.6 x 69.2 cm (37 1/4 x 27 1/4 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Eleven-Headed, Thousand-Armed Bodhisattva of Compassion (Avalokiteshvara), c. 1500. Western Tibet. Opaque watercolor and ink on cotton; overall: 94.6 x 69.2 cm (37 1/4 x 27 1/4 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Lojong Slogan Generator

19. All Dharma has a single purpose

  • This is the First Slogan/Instruction of Point Five, which consists of four instructions.
  • Point Five is “Evaluating Mind Training”

According to Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche: 

 The first instruction is that all dharma, all the teachings of the Hinayana and Mahayana, have one common purpose: to reduce or eliminate the clinging to a self. Whatever dharma we practice, whatever mind training we meditate on, the purpose is to diminish that clinging. If our clinging doesn’t diminish, then our practice isn’t working properly. If we notice that the continual thought of ourselves as important is decreasing, it is one sign that mind training is working.
If we want to know whether our dharma practice is working or not, we have to examine it by asking, “Do I still consider myself to be important? Am I still clinging to my self as something precious?” For instance, if we had a piece of gold and wanted to know how much we had, we could not know this just by looking at it. We would have to put it on a scale and weigh it. Similarly, measuring our clinging to self is a way of telling if our dharma practice is working. Is our clinging to the self diminishing or increasing?

It is said there are 84,000 kinds of dharma, which are too numerous to understand and practice fully. For instance, if practitioners in the main vehicles of the Hinayana, the Mahayana, and the Vajrayana do not have a thorough understanding, they may have the impression that the Hinayana or Shravakayana is very different from Mahayana and even more different >from the Vajrayana. This is not a correct view because all of the Buddha’s teachings agree.

The Seven Points of Mind Training

Miniature stone stele; overall: 9.6 x 5.3 cm (3 3/4 x 2 1/16 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Vajravarahi: Dancing Dakini, 1000s-1100s. Nepal, 11th-12th century. Miniature stone stele; overall: 9.6 x 5.3 cm (3 3/4 x 2 1/16 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art