Lojong Slogan Generator

52. Avoid misunderstandings

  • This is the Fourteenth Slogan/Instruction of Point Seven, which consists of twenty-one instructions.
  • Point Seven is “Guidelines for Mind Training”

There are six things that you may twist or misinterpret in your practice: patience, yearning, excitement, compassion, priorities, and joy. It is a misinterpretation of patience to be patient about everything in your life but the practice of dharma. Misinterpreted yearning is to foster yearning for pleasure and wealth but not to encourage the yearning to practice dharma thoroughly and properly. Misinterpreted excitement is to get excited by wealth and entertainment, but not to be excited by the study of dharma. It is twisted compassion to be compassionate to those who endure hardships in order to practice dharma, but to be unconcerned and uncompassionate to those who do evil. Twisted priorities means to work diligently out of self-interest at that which benefits you in the world, but not to practice dharma. Twisted joy is to be happy when sorrow afflicts your enemies, but not to rejoice in virtue and in the joy of transcending samsara. You should absolutely and completely stop all six of those misinterpretations.

Chögyam Trungpa, Training the Mind and Cultivating Loving-Kindness

Brass or bronze; turquoise; overall: 10.8 x 6.7 cm (4 1/4 x 2 5/8 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Achala, c 1300s ?. Nepal. Brass or bronze; turquoise; overall: 10.8 x 6.7 cm (4 1/4 x 2 5/8 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Lojong Slogan Generator

21. Always have the support of a joyful mind

  • This is the Third Slogan/Instruction of Point Five, which consists of four instructions.
  • Point Five is “Evaluating Mind Training”

Chögyam Trungpa wrote,

The point of this slogan is continuously to maintain joyful satisfaction. That means that every mishap is good, because it is encouragement for you to practice the dharma. Other people’s mishaps are good also: you should share them and bring them into yourself as the continuity of their practice or discipline. So you should include that also. It is very nice to feel that way, actually.

Chögyam Trungpa, Training the Mind and Cultivating Loving-Kindness

Ivory; overall: 29.2 cm (11 1/2 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art

Bodhisattva of Compassion (Avalokiteshvara), 1647-1648 or 1658. Chöying Dorjé, the Tenth Black Hat Karmapa (Tibetan, 1604-1674). Ivory; overall: 29.2 cm (11 1/2 in.). The Cleveland Museum of Art